Sunday, 31 May 2015

IRELAND IN BRIEF







Click here to download a PDF booklet which provides a general overview of Ireland’s political, economic and cultural life.

Friday, 29 May 2015

REVISING GEORGE ORWELL


Here you can revise "Animal Farm",  the allegorical dystopian novel written by George Orwell and published in England in 1945.


Here you can find a detailed analysis of "1984",  a political novel written with the purpose of warning readers in the West of the dangers of totalitarian government. 

Wednesday, 20 May 2015

A ROOM OF ONE'S OWN


"I would venture to guess that Anon, who wrote so many poems without signing them, was often a woman."
Virginia Woolf

Tuesday, 19 May 2015

REVISING VIRGINIA WOOLF




"Fiction is like a spider's web, attached ever so lightly perhaps, but still attached to life at all four corners. Often the attachment is scarcely perceptible."
Virginia Woolf


Monday, 18 May 2015

THE MODERN AGE - THE LITERARY BACKGROUND


Click here and  here to revise Modernism in literature.


Monday, 11 May 2015

WILFRED OWEN


Wilfred Edward Salter Owen was born 18 March 1893 in Oswestry, Shropshire. After school he became a teaching assistant and in 1913 went to France for two years to work as a language tutor. He began writing poetry as a teenager.
In 1915 he returned to England to enlist in the army and was commissioned into the Manchester Regiment. After spending the remainder of the year training in England, he left for the western front early in January 1917. After experiencing heavy fighting, he was diagnosed with shellshock. He was evacuated to England and arrived at Craiglockhart War Hospital near Edinburgh in June. There he met the poet Siegfried Sassoon, who already had a reputation as a poet and shared Owen's views. Sassoon agreed to look over Owen's poems, gave him encouragement and introduced him to literary figures such as Robert Graves.
Reading Sassoon's poems and discussing his work with Sassoon revolutionised Owen's style and his conception of poetry. He returned to France in August 1918 and in October was awarded the Military Cross for bravery. On 4 November 1918 he was killed while attempting to lead his men across the Sambre canal at Ors. The news of his death reached his parents on 11 November, Armistice Day.
Edited by Sassoon and published in 1920, Owen's single volume of poems contain some of the most poignant English poetry of World War One, including "Dulce et Decorum Est" and "Anthem for Doomed Youth".

Here you can find a detailed analysis of the poem.




Thursday, 7 May 2015

THE WAR POETS


Here you can find a PDF presentation about the War Poets.




Find out more about poetry in World War One: http://www.bbc.co.uk/guides/z38rq6f

Friday, 1 May 2015

MAY


"Sweet May hath come to love us,
Flowers, trees, their blossoms don;
And through the blue heavens above us
The very clouds move on."

Heinrich Heine, Book of Songs